Almshouses

Almshouses are a form of social housing. They are typically funded by a charity, sometimes from a donation made by a family or religious group. Often there are rules that the people living in them must have worked in a particular field, or have been married to someone who did. 

NCHA manages almshouses all over the East Midlands, providing support to the charities that administer them. We provide housing management and maintenance work, usually through our Nottingham Community Almhouse Charity (NCAC). NCHA is also the trustee of Blyth Cottages Charity and the Warner Almshouse Charity, and is able to work with further almshouse charities to secure their long-term future. 

If you'd like to know more about our work in this area, please contact us. If you're interested in living in an almshouse, use our find a home tool to search for current vacancies. 

Our almshouses

>
Chestnut Grove Almshouses

R.W.S. Chestnut Grove, Nottingham

Robert Wilkinson Smith was a lace manufacturer with a factory on Stoney Street, Nottingham. In his will he expressed the wish to form an almshouse charity and following his death the charity purchased some land on Chestnut Grove and the properties were built in 1910. The two bedroom houses are for women or couples over the age of 50. Applicants must live or have lived in Nottingham or Nottinghamshire.

Hardstaff Homes Gedling

Miss M.E. Hardstaff Homes, Gedling, Nottingham

Two bedroom bungalows and two and three bedroom houses for people over the age of 50. Applicants must live or have lived in Nottingham or Nottinghamshire.

Hardstaff Homes Giltbrook

Miss M.E. Hardstaff Homes, Giltbrook, Nottingham

Mary Elizabeth Hardstaff was born in 1843. Her father, Dodson Hardstaff, was one of the owners of the Digby Colliery and she inherited his estate. She left her money to the founding of almshouses in Giltbrook for the benefit of miners families in the area. She died in 1899 (aged 56) and her trustees built a row of terraced houses which were later converted into the present almshouses. The one bedroom ground floor and first floor flats are for people over the age of 50. Applicants must live or have lived in Nottingham or Nottinghamshire.

Hardstaff Homes Mansfield Woodhouse

Miss M.E. Hardstaff Homes and J.G. Ryley Almshouses, Mansfield Woodhouse

In 1919 Miss Hardstaff's trustees converted a row of terraced houses into almshouse flats. In 1975 four bungalows were also built on the same site, two of which were funded by the J.G. Ryley Trust. These one-bedroom flats and bungalows and two-bedroom houses are for people over the age of 60 who live or have lived in Mansfield/Mansfield Woodhouse or Nottinghamshire.

Albert Ball Memorial Homes

Captain Albert Ball VC Memorial Homes, Nottingham

Captain Albert Ball was one of the great heroes of the First World War. He first joined the Sherwood Forresters on his 18th birthday and later transferred to the Royal Flying Corps to see more action. He was a fearless airman and received many awards including the Victoria Cross. He sadly died in 1917. His father, Alderman Ball, built the properties in memorial of his son and the first resident took up residency in 1922. The one bedroom houses are for people over the age of 50. Applicants must live or have lived in Lenton, Nottingham or Nottinghamshire.

Frances Longden Almshouses

Frances Longden’s Almshouses, Bramcote

Three cottages built in 1852 and endowed by Frances Jane Longden for poor members of the Church of England who live in the ancient parish of Bramcote. NCHA assumed trusteeship in 2007.

Coupe Almshouses

Coupe Almshouses, Hucknall

Elizabeth Ann Coupe was the wife of a local butcher who owned a shop on Hucknall high street. They set up a charity and instructed it to build two almshouses in their memory when they passed away. The two-bedroom bungalows are for people over the age of 50. Applicants must live or have lived in Nottingham.

Hind Almshouses

Hind Memorial Homes, Edwalton

The Hind family was a prominent family in Nottingham at the turn of the 20th century. Mr Jesse Hind was a solicitor who lived at Edwalton Hall and also held many public offices in the city. He had three sons and two daughters. In 1930, following his death, his second son Oliver, built the almshouses in his memory. The two-bedroom bungalows are for people over the age of 50. Applicants must live or have lived in Nottingham or Nottinghamshire.